Virtual Network

Official Documentation

Service Description

With Virtual Network, Microsoft Azure can be used as an extension to local infrastructure where additional resources can be deployed flexibly and temporarily from the cloud. Network configurations can be created to integrate local computers or networks with network nodes in Microsoft Azure into a virtual network. The cloud resources can be provided their own IPv4 addresses, and custom routing tables can be expanded to include these resources. Combined with Virtual Machines, this makes it possible to migrate virtual machines back and forth between the customer's data center and Microsoft Azure and to provide appropriate configurations for this at the network level so that the migration occurs entirely transparently for the other network elements. Ultimately, users can utilize Azure-based resources as though they were in their own data center.

Getting Started

  1. Getting Started on Azure: Virtual Networks
    12/30/2016, Video, 0:05:43
  2. Azure Networking Deep Dive
    2/1/2017, Video, 0:46:44
  3. Microsoft Azure for IT Pros Content Series: Virtual Networking
    9/30/2016, Mva
  4. Achieve high-performance datacenter expansion with Azure Networking
    10/2/2016, Video, 1:24:46
  5. Use Azure Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) as a starting point on your cloud journey
    9/28/2016, Video, 1:08:59
  6. Deciding between the different hybrid networking options in Azure
    9/29/2015, Video, 0:23:17

Latest Content

RSS Feed

Title  
General availability: Multiple IP addresses per network interface Blog
Azure Batch – VNET and Custom Image Support for Virtual Machine Pools Blog
SONiC: The networking switch software that powers the Microsoft Global Cloud Video
Azure Network Innovation Video
Introducing Network Performance Monitor for network visibility across public and hybrid clouds Blog
Microsoft Networking Academy with the Azure Black Belt Team – Winter 2017! Blog
Azure Networking Fridays 2/17/2017 Video
Public IP Addresses of Azure Datacenters Blog
Public IP Addresses of Azure Datacenters Blog
Public preview: Cross-subscription virtual network peering Blog
Public preview: Multiple IP addresses per NIC Blog
Announcing the new Azure Marketplace experience Blog

Azure Documentation

1. Overview
     1.1. Virtual networks
     1.2. User-defined routes and IP forwarding
     1.3. Virtual network peering
     1.4. Business continuity
     1.5. FAQ
     1.6. IP addressing
          1.6.1. Resource Manager
          1.6.2. Classic
     1.7. Virtual machines
          1.7.1. Network interfaces
          1.7.2. Name resolution
2. Get Started
     2.1. Create a virtual network
     2.2. Deploy a VM to a virtual network
3. How To
     3.1. Plan and design
          3.1.1. Virtual networks
          3.1.2. Network security groups
     3.2. Deploy
          3.2.1. Virtual networks
               3.2.1.1. Portal
               3.2.1.2. PowerShell
               3.2.1.3. CLI
               3.2.1.4. Template
               3.2.1.5. Portal (Classic)
               3.2.1.6. PowerShell (Classic)
               3.2.1.7. CLI (Classic)
          3.2.2. Network security groups
               3.2.2.1. Portal
               3.2.2.2. PowerShell
               3.2.2.3. CLI
               3.2.2.4. Template
               3.2.2.5. PowerShell (Classic)
               3.2.2.6. CLI (Classic)
          3.2.3. User-defined routes
               3.2.3.1. PowerShell
               3.2.3.2. CLI
               3.2.3.3. Template
               3.2.3.4. PowerShell (Classic)
               3.2.3.5. CLI (Classic)
          3.2.4. Virtual network peering
               3.2.4.1. Portal
               3.2.4.2. PowerShell
               3.2.4.3. Template
          3.2.5. Virtual machines
               3.2.5.1. Static public IP addresses
                    3.2.5.1.1. Portal
                    3.2.5.1.2. PowerShell
                    3.2.5.1.3. CLI
                    3.2.5.1.4. Template
                    3.2.5.1.5. PowerShell (Classic)
               3.2.5.2. Static private IP addresses
                    3.2.5.2.1. Portal
                    3.2.5.2.2. PowerShell
                    3.2.5.2.3. CLI
                    3.2.5.2.4. Portal (Classic)
                    3.2.5.2.5. PowerShell (Classic)
                    3.2.5.2.6. CLI (Classic)
               3.2.5.3. Multiple network interfaces
                    3.2.5.3.1. PowerShell
                    3.2.5.3.2. CLI
                    3.2.5.3.3. Template
                    3.2.5.3.4. PowerShell (Classic)
                    3.2.5.3.5. CLI (Classic)
               3.2.5.4. Multiple IP addresses
                    3.2.5.4.1. Azure portal
                    3.2.5.4.2. PowerShell
                    3.2.5.4.3. CLI
                    3.2.5.4.4. Template
          3.2.6. Connectivity scenarios
               3.2.6.1. Virtual network (VNet) to VNet
               3.2.6.2. VNet (Resource Manager) to a VNet (Classic)
               3.2.6.3. VNet to on-premises network (VPN)
               3.2.6.4. VNet to on-premises network (ExpressRoute)
               3.2.6.5. Highly available hybrid network architecture
          3.2.7. Security scenarios
               3.2.7.1. Secure networks with virtual appliances
               3.2.7.2. DMZ between Azure and the Internet
               3.2.7.3. Cloud service and network security
                    3.2.7.3.1. Simple DMZ with NSGs
                    3.2.7.3.2. DMZ with firewall and NSGs
                    3.2.7.3.3. DMZ with firewall, UDR, and NSGs
                    3.2.7.3.4. Sample application
     3.3. Configure
          3.3.1. Accelerated networking for VMs
               3.3.1.1. Azure portal
               3.3.1.2. PowerShell
          3.3.2. Optimize VM network throughput
          3.3.3. Access control lists
               3.3.3.1. Classic portal
               3.3.3.2. PowerShell
     3.4. Manage
          3.4.1. Network security groups
               3.4.1.1. Portal
               3.4.1.2. PowerShell
               3.4.1.3. CLI
               3.4.1.4. Logs
          3.4.2. Virtual machines
               3.4.2.1. View and modify hostnames
               3.4.2.2. Move a VM to a different subnet
     3.5. Troubleshoot
          3.5.1. Network security groups
               3.5.1.1. Portal
               3.5.1.2. PowerShell
          3.5.2. Routes
               3.5.2.1. Portal
               3.5.2.2. PowerShell
4. Reference
     4.1. PowerShell (Resource manager)
     4.2. PowerShell (Classic)
     4.3. Azure CLI
     4.4. Java
     4.5. REST (Resource Manager)
     4.6. REST (Classic)
5. Related
     5.1. Virtual Machines
     5.2. Application Gateway
     5.3. Azure DNS
     5.4. Traffic Manager
     5.5. Load Balancer
     5.6. VPN Gateway
     5.7. ExpressRoute
6. Resources
     6.1. Networking blog
     6.2. Networking forum
     6.3. Pricing
     6.4. Stack Overflow

Tools

Tool Description
CloudMonix CloudMonix enhances Microsoft Azure by providing deep monitoring of most of Azure's infrastructure via live dashboards, ability to self-heal from many different production issues, on-demand historical performance and uptime reports, customizable alerts & notifications, sophisticated auto-scaling engine, integration to third party systems, and a lot more.

Videos

Date Title Length
3/7/2017 SONiC: The networking switch software that powers the Microsoft Global Cloud 0:02:09
3/6/2017 Azure Network Innovation 0:02:07
2/17/2017 Azure Networking Fridays 2/17/2017 0:57:30
2/3/2017 Azure Networking Fridays 2/3/2017 1:05:57
2/1/2017 Azure Networking Deep Dive 0:46:44
1/25/2017 Azure Networking Fridays 1/20/2017 0:48:38
12/30/2016 Getting Started on Azure: Virtual Networks 0:05:43
12/6/2016 Azure Networking Fridays 12/2/2016 0:56:05
11/14/2016 Azure Networking Fridays 11/11/2016 0:58:10
11/3/2016 Virtual Network (vNet) Peering 0:13:41

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